Live! From the CNN Secret Supper
November 10th, 2010
06:00 PM ET
Share this on:

We've been teasing you all week that today, November 10th, Eatocracy is hosting its inaugural Secret Supper in Atlanta, Georgia, centered around the topic of how chefs' increasingly close collaboration with farmers figures into the preservation and evolution of Southern cooking. We've been encouraging you take your place at the (virtual) table, by joining in the conversation and cooking along at home.

And now, the time has come for the big reveal. Ring that dinner bell, Linton! Yup - chef Linton Hopkins and the kind folks at Atlanta's Restaurant Eugene are serving up the night's fare with a distinctively Southern sense of place. Not only is Chef Hopkins the president of the Southern Foodways Alliance, he is a two-time James Beard Award nominee and was named one of Food & Wine magazine's "Best New Chefs" in 2009. We've always been so impressed with his relationship with local and artisan farmers and purveyors, we knew he was our guy - that, and he's just so gosh darn darlin'.

As the first guests start to arrive and the kitchen gets ready for the passed hors d'œuvres - we snuck back for some preparation picks. Candied bacon, anyone?
FULL POST



5@5 - 'Top Chef: Just Desserts' Judge Dannielle Kyrillos
November 10th, 2010
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Dannielle Kyrillos is an entertaining expert, the editor-at-large of DailyCandy and judge on Bravo's "Top Chef: Just Desserts."

Depending on your perspective, and your relatives' relative degree of craziness, one of the great or not-so-great aspects of the holidays is that heated, extended-family conversation moves from the phone and e-mail to the dinner table, and somehow, as long as you're talking about food, it's O.K. for the gloves to come off. Way off. You don't need to be reminded that your mother-in-law will get away with pretending it's your stuffing she's calling career-obsessed and barren.

Of course, we should never judge food carefully prepared by another human being, as food is love - but everyone does. In this or any other situation calling for culinary critique, take the high road, yes, but get your point across.

5 Ways to Judge Other People's Cooking Without Sounding Mean (Or at Least Not Too Mean): Dannielle Kyrillos
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Television • Think • Top Chef


Lunchtime poll – favorite regional Southern fare
November 10th, 2010
01:00 PM ET
Share this on:

On Wednesday, November 10th, Eatocracy is hosting its inaugural Secret Supper in Atlanta, Georgia, centered around the topic of how chefs' increasingly close collaboration with farmers figures into the preservation and evolution of Southern cooking. Take your place at the (virtual) table, by joining in the conversation and cooking along at home.

In anticipation of tonight's surely scrumptious Southern supper, we've been talking an awful lot about what Southern food actually IS. We quoted from Craig Claiborne – the seminal New York Times food editor and restaurant critic born in 1920 in Sunflower, Mississippi – statement on the difficulty of this culinary definition.

As he explained in his 1987 cookbook, ‘Craig Claiborne's Southern Cooking,’ “It is not a question of chauvinism, but I have always averred that Southern cooking is by far the vastest and most varied of all traditional regional cooking of the nation. … Complete volumes could and have been written about each of these elements of Southern cooking – Creole, Cajun, Tex-Mex, soul food and barbecues. An encyclopedic, exhaustive study of all Southern dishes would, of necessity, demand a number of books sufficient to fill a library shelf, and more.”

Yeah – but you can't eat your books. Pick a favorite and wax rhapsodic in the comments below.

Posted by:
Filed under: Buzz • Cuisines • Lunchtime Poll • Secret Suppers • Southern


Southern food: more voices from the field
November 10th, 2010
12:15 PM ET
Share this on:

On Wednesday, November 10th, Eatocracy is hosting its inaugural Secret Supper in Atlanta, Georgia, centered around the topic of how chefs' increasingly close collaboration with farmers figures into the preservation and evolution of Southern cooking. Take your place at the (virtual) table, by joining in the conversation and cooking along at home.

Earlier today, we wrote about the chefs who are devoting their lives to reclaiming the soul of Southern food from its prevalent representation as bad-for-you, deep-fried and cream-smothered genetically modified and overly-processed comfort food.

Here are some more thoughts on the matter from chefs and writers who heavily invested in the past, present and future of Southern food.

“One of the beautiful things about the South is that we are so enamored with every aspect of past, present and future. One of the most exciting challenges about being a chef in the South right now is the balance of those three pieces of time with respect to ingredients and technique.

A great example would be greens. You can put a pair of fancy pants on a pice of meat, but if you serve it with greens it better damn well be the greens your grandmother cooked. Southern food is, in my opinion, a great microcosm for the way we live. We always have progress on our minds, but never for a second do we abandon our traditions and forget who we are. The movement for heritage breeds of 'meats' and 'threes' suits us just fine.” – Chef Kelly English, Restaurant Iris

FULL POST

Filed under: Cuisines • Secret Suppers • Southern


Recent comments
Pinterest
| Part of
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 6,972 other followers