5@5 - Writer Kim Severson
October 19th, 2010
05:00 PM ET
Share this on:

5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Kim Severson is a four-time James Beard award-winning food writer, and former staff writer for The New York Times. Her memoir, “Spoon Fed: How Eight Cooks Saved My Life,” was published in April 2010.

This past July, Severson announced that she is leaving her food writing position at The Times and moving to Atlanta to assume the role as the paper's bureau chief there. Of the move, she writes:

I’m moving from my job as a Dining writer for The New York Times to one in which I will cover the south as the Atlanta bureau chief for The New York Times. That means a move from Brooklyn to Atlanta and a forced purging of the kitchen. The onions, potatoes and garlic can all be distributed to friends and neighbors. The Rancho Gordo beans and AP flour can go in a box and meet me in Atlanta. But the movers have a strict no liquids/no perishables policy. What's worse, the airlines have a draconian approach to carrying certain food and drink in carry-on luggage. And I’ll be without refrigeration for a bit. As a result, my heart is already starting to break for the things I can’t take with me.

Five Things I Am Sorry to Leave Behind When I Move: Kim Severson
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: 5@5 • Think


October 19th, 2010
03:00 PM ET
Share this on:

A third generation winemaker, Gina Gallo, shares her tricks of the trade for making it in the wine business.

“It does sound like a wonderful fantasy. 'I want to go make wine! I want to go to Wine Country!" - but it can be a very hard business because it’s agriculture," said Gallo.

Among the keys to success: passion, love, desire and a great mentor.

CNNMoney has the FULL VIDEO

Posted by:
Filed under: Business and Farming News • Sip • Wine


Lunchtime poll – hangover helpers
October 19th, 2010
12:15 PM ET
Share this on:

Yesterday evening at a Polynesian bar a few blocks off Las Vegas Boulevard, I hoisted a tiki mug (or two) with a dear old friend. A couple of hours in, I excused myself to the ladies room and as I was fussing over my lipstick in the mirror, a woman lurched in and beelined for a stall behind me. Signs pointed to her...not being well.

Can't say she hadn't been warned. Each drink's potency level is demarcated on the menu; two cartoon skulls means a gentle buzz and five - hold onto your kula shaker. My grand total for the evening was a five, and judging from the distress I overheard - and the bucket I noted the bartender toting over to the dark dais where her party had been whooping it up - she netted out at a 10+.

One red-eye flight and a bumpy cab ride back to Brooklyn, I'm fresh as a daisy. I cannot imagine this day is being similarly kind to to our wounded Wahine.

Posted by:
Filed under: Buzz • Lunchtime Poll • Sip


Box lunch
October 19th, 2010
12:00 PM ET
Share this on:

Sink your teeth into today's top stories from around the globe.

  • Presenting the world's largest toast mosaic. - Daily Mail


  • Grinding flour: so easy, a caveman could do it. In fact, they did. - Nature News


  • Barry Estabrook tells the tale of Florida's Coalition of Immokalee Workers, and their continual fight for ethical agriculture. - The Atlantic


  • From molten cake to water sommeliers, restaurant trends that need a 1,000-year ban. - Esquire


  • A new study found more Americans than ever before, an estimated 3 percent, have at least one food allergy. - Los Angeles Times
Posted by:
Filed under: Box Lunch • News


October 19th, 2010
10:30 AM ET
Share this on:



Breakfast buffet
October 19th, 2010
09:00 AM ET
Share this on:

While you're frying up some eggs and bacon, we're cooking up something else: a way to celebrate today's food holiday and the most delicious finds on TV.

Something's fishy! It must be October 19 - National Seafood Bisque Day.

Though there are countless variations, seafood bisque is typically made by combining some sort of sautéed fish or crustacean with a heavy form of dairy - whole milk, cream or butter. Add spices and vegetables to taste and you’ll be casting off any other dinner obligations.

What's on TV?
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Breakfast Buffet • Food Holidays • News


October 19th, 2010
05:30 AM ET
Share this on:

Shawna Shepherd is a producer at CNN.

There’s got to be a better way. That’s what I thought when I was standing in the supermarket aisle staring at pricey bottles of vanilla extract. This was around the holidays, when I typically bake a lot, and I was going through it quickly. I wanted quality vanilla at a reasonable price and since I couldn’t get that at the store, I decided to take matters into my own hands.

Vanilla extract, a staple ingredient in most cookie and baking recipes, can be made inexpensively from home with just two ingredients.

Anyone who has a busy job or a family might scoff at the notion of making something from scratch because who has the time? As a young professional who travels a lot, I won’t take on anything that requires a lot of upkeep. But trust me, making vanilla extract requires very little time and maintenance. You will impress both baking novices and do-it-yourself enthusiasts.
FULL POST

Posted by:
Filed under: Experimental • Make • Recipes


Pinterest
Archive
October 2010
M T W T F S S
« Sep   Nov »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
| Part of