August 12th, 2010
10:30 PM ET
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August 12th, 2010
05:45 PM ET
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As we get to the bits and bones of things today, we present a brief interlude on one *loose* interpretation of vegetarianism.

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Filed under: Chewing Scenery • Movies • Think • Video


5@5 - Chef and Writer Ian Knauer
August 12th, 2010
05:00 PM ET
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5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

Ian Knauer is spending most of his time these days developing recipes for his upcoming cookbook based on his family’s farm in Pennsylvania where he hunts, keeps a garden and a bee hive. (You can follow along on his blog, "Big City Country Boy.")

He honed his cooking and writing chops at 'Gourmet' magazine from 2001 to 2009, where he co-hosted the magazine’s award-winning television series, 'Diary of a Foodie,' and the most recent show, 'Adventures with Ruth.' He wrote extensively for 'Gourmet' and Gourmet.com until the close of the brand in late 2009.

If you’re eating at a table with Ian, there’s a strong chance he’ll serve you something as delicious as it is strange.

5 Unlikely Animal Parts You NEED To Learn How To Cook ... 'Cause They’re Awesome: Ian Knauer
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Filed under: 5@5 • Think


3.4 million years of meat and marrow meals
August 12th, 2010
03:30 PM ET
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A report in this week's issue of Nature magazine reveals that an international research team based in Ethiopia has uncovered evidence that Australopithecus afarensis - human ancestors circa the skeleton colloquially known as "Lucy" - butchered animals, presumably for nutritious meat and bone marrow. Tool marks made by sharp, heavy rocks were found on 3.4 million-year-old fossilized rib and thigh bones from animals, indicating that humans began eating meat 800,000 years earlier than was previously believed.

Team member Shannon McPherron, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, wrote in a statement released by the institute, "Now, when we imagine Lucy walking around the east African landscape looking for food, we can for the first time imagine her with a stone tool in hand and looking for meat." He noted that the animal bones in question come from an impala-sized creature and one closer in size to a bear.

PETA members might not see this as cause for celebration, but as staunch omnivores, we say honor your ancestors and roast up a couple of marrow bones for dinner.
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Filed under: Make • Meat • News • Recipes • Staples


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