July 28th, 2010
06:00 PM ET
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"We'll still have seafood yeah, but my granny's shrimp boulettes are gonna taste different for a while. Alabama and Florida shrimp are sweet, Texas shrimp are a bit iodiney, Louisiana shrimp is the medium between flavors. They have a very distinct taste. I have tried shrimp from other places and they're good, but they're nothing compared to ours."

"And, having been born on the bayou, I will never eat farm-raised seafood. I like that wild taste, and I can't imagine having to buy shrimp. It's always been given to me by family that trawls. Oh, and Blackened Catfish has a whole new meaning now." - CajunB

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Filed under: Buzz • Comment of the Day • From the Comments


5@5 - Filmmaker Joe York
July 28th, 2010
05:00 PM ET
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5@5 is a daily, food-related list from chefs, writers, political pundits, musicians, actors, and all manner of opinionated people from around the globe.

If you've been hanging around Eatocracy, you might have noticed we talk a lot about preserving your family's cooking heritage and how people really eat in their day-to-day life.  With that same outlook in mind, we turn it over to a man who has made it his mission to do the same thing on-screen.

Joe York works at the University of Mississippi's Media & Documentary Projects Center where he produces short films in association with the Southern Foodways Alliance, an organization that "documents, studies, and celebrates the diverse food cultures of the changing American South."

Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Joe York.

5 Favorite Food Documentaries: Joe York
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Filed under: 5@5 • Movies • Think


Tales of the Cocktail: Saintly booze, steaming Scotch and smoked banana peels
July 28th, 2010
04:00 PM ET
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Sam Meyer is an editor at CNN and blogs about cocktails at cocktailians.com.

Oh, it's a thin line between Saturday night and Sunday morning. How do Tales of the Cocktail attendees go to church? They attend a seminar on "Religious Beverages" with Allen Katz and Garrett Oliver. Oliver, brewmaster at Brooklyn Brewery, drew the connections between Trappist ales and other beverages originated by monks, such as Bénédictine and Chartreuse - which French Carthusian monks still make and sell it to support their order.

The discussion concludes with a Vieux Carré. Named after the French Quarter, the drink contains Bénédictine – as well as other New Orleans-associated ingredients like rye, Cognac, and Peychaud's Bitters – and was invented by bartender Walter Bergeron at the nearby Hotel Monteleone in 1938. It's a fitting end to a weekend in the French Quarter devoted to fine cocktails.
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Filed under: Cocktail Recipes • Sip • Spirits • Tales of the Cocktail


Blogger Spotlight: A Little Bit of Spain in Iowa
July 28th, 2010
02:30 PM ET
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Every weekday, we're highlighting a blogger we think you ought to know about. We can’t be everywhere at once, so we look to these passionate eaters, cooks and writers to keep us tapped into every facet of the food world. Consider this a way to get to know a blog’s taste buds, because, well, you should.

Who: Diana Bauman, of A Little Bit of Spain in Iowa
Where: Des Moines, Iowa
Twitter: @dianabauman

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Filed under: Blog Spotlight • Blogs • Think


July 28th, 2010
12:45 PM ET
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Mad Men season premiere director Phil Abraham on sourcing the correct 1960s-style canned ham.

Q: Is there a prop from this episode that was especially hard to get a hold of?

A: I can tell you one thing that comes to mind is the canned ham.... Ellen [Freund, the prop master] found this Polish canned ham and presented it to Matt and Matt goes wait a minute, the hams were bigger and thinner and looked different [back then]. And that sent Ellen... on a journey of finding the canned ham that Matt had in mind... She was just one step short of actually manufacturing the can in the way that Matt had remembered it being. Ultimately I think it was decided that the can she found was still a really good canned ham and in fact we found precedent that they had canned hams in that size from the period.

Read the rest of the interview on AMCtv.com and get a retro recipe for the episode's much-touted Chicken Kiev

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Filed under: Mad Men • Television


Lunchtime poll – kid dishes
July 28th, 2010
12:15 PM ET
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It turns out that kid-friendly cookery is a red-hot issue with a lot of parents, judging from the intensely polarized dialogue amongst the commenters on yesterday's 5@5 with chef Marc Murphy, wherein he listed his favorite dishes to cook with his progeny. Some felt his recipes were overly complicated and costly to be considered kid cuisine, and others applauded his ambition.

How wacky do you get in the kitchen with the wee ones?

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Filed under: Buzz • Lunchtime Poll


Box lunch
July 28th, 2010
12:00 PM ET
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Sink your teeth into today's top stories from around the globe.

  • May I interest you in a grass-fed burger on a plate of fallen palm leaves? In pursuit of the eco-conscious cookout. - Wall Street Journal


  • At the ripe age of 378 years old, the nation’s oldest running family farm is up for sale in New Hampshire. - The Boston Globe


  • A family goes cold (free-range) turkey on processed foods for one hundred days. See you later, tater ... tot. - Charlotte Observer



  • Why has nothing really worked in the fight against obesity? - The Atlantic
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July 28th, 2010
11:30 AM ET
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In cooking, the process of clarification entails straining out extraneous muck from liquids so that they might be pure, clear and ideal for consumption. With this series on the world's dietary tribes, customs and foodways we're attempting to do the same.

Also on the topic of community supported agriculture, watch Fresh farm food to consumers and 100 miles to meet their food
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Filed under: Business and Farming News • Clarified • CSA • Farms • News


Dishes at risk – cooking on the Gulf Coast
July 28th, 2010
10:42 AM ET
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Play along for a minute. Imagine that suddenly, there's no mayonnaise for sale. The factories that produce the stuff were suddenly hit by an asteroid and rendered useless for the forseeable future.

Tragic, yes, but it may or may not have a measurable impact on your daily life. You'll swap in mustard on your lunchtime sandwich for now. It doesn't taste the same, but it's something. You could always whip out the whisk and make a batch of fresh, homemade mayo like you've seen Julia Child do on TV a million times, but you’re a busy, working person.

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